Error’d: Cinch

Yankee Ezra A. explains the screenshot below at some length. Says he: "I live in Newton, MA, an affluent, wealthy suburb of Boston. In general, city services are excellent, although the home page of the website is a bit crowded, so I was glad to get an email with a link to the page where I could see how the city is handling my request/complaint about sidewalks, via the city's 311 service (I have no idea what the 311 stands for) When I went to the website, I found what you see in the photo. I guess one can't really complain about one small error in a large website." It's certainly an effective strategy for keeping the complaints box empty!

311

 

At the same time, German Beatrix W. uncovers a related truth about warranty service. "I never realised before how hard checking checkboxes can be. Also never seen them called tickbox before. The form didn't work anyways and I just got an error. This was just the experience I had with that company elsewhere."
Most organizations will make very certain that their revenue-earning pages work well. They're not so motivated to fix pages that might cost them something. Right, Ezra?

tickbox

 

"My Yams Are Cooked", cried Brian R. "Tried to change my password with my mobile provider, but I guess the joke's on me, MYAC MYAC MYAC."

myac

 

Wandering Worf wonders "So can I Uber or Lyft a DeLorean back so I can log in and keep my password?"

time

 

BorrowerFirstName Christopher R. easily shaded the marketing department of Freedom Mortgage: "Subject lines are rarely so on point." It was a cinch.

breakdown

 

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This post originally appeared on The Daily WTF.

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